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Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q: Why does my dog scratch himself silly?
  • A: The most common cause of constant itching is pollen allergy (such as mold, dust, etc.). Realize that allergies in pets, as in people, are genetic. Your pet may experience seasonal allergies. Your dog also may have parasites, like scabies, or even a skin infection. If your dog is persistently scratching, visit your veterinarian. There are many treatments your veterinarian can administer to ease your pet.

  • Q: Is it okay to feed my cat milk?
  • A: Veterinarians generally do not recommend feeding milk to our feline friends. A cat's digestive system does not digest milk well. Feeding milk to your cat can cause diarrhea, which can lead to further nutritional problems (your cat won't be able to absorb nutrients from his food).

  • Q: When boarding my pets, what should I look for?
  • A: If you ever have to board your pet, the first thing you should do is read the article "How To Select a Pet Care Facility" at the American Boarding Kennels Association web site http://www.abka.com/abka/ Always visit and tour the entire facility first, and perhaps even do a trial run or one night prior to any long term boarding. While on your trip, maybe ask a friend to stop by just to check on your pet. Also ask if they are certified by the American Boarding Kennels Association, and not just a member. Most of the places require also your dog to be vaccinated against kennel cough and other diseases. Always ask what kind of vaccines or tests are needed at least 10 days before boarding.

  • Q: Will My Pet Have Stitches?
  • A: For many surgeries, we use absorbable sutures underneath the skin. These do not need to be removed later. Some surgeries, especially tumor removals, do require skin stitches. Most dogs and cats do not lick excessively or chew at the incision, but this is an occasional problem you will also need to watch for. If there are skin sutures, these will usually be removed 10 to14 days after surgery. You will also need to limit your pet's activity level for a time and no baths are allowed for the first 10 days after surgery.

  • Q: Do I need to have an appointment?
  • A: Yes, patients are seen by appointment. Walk-ins will be seen if time allows.

  • Q: What forms of payment do you accept?
  • A: Cash, Check, MasterCard and Visa

  • Q: At what age can I have my pet spayed or neutered?
  • A: Spaying or neutering can be done at approximately 6 months of age. Your pet is given an exam prior to surgery to help determine whether your pet is healthy enough to undergo the surgical procedure. Also, for elder patients a pre-anesthetic blood screen is recommended (over 6 years mandatory). Current vaccinations are required at the time of surgery.

  • Q: Is it a good idea to let my pet have at least one litter?
  • A: No, there is no advantage to letting your pet have one litter. However there are plenty of advantages to having your pet spayed or neutered. Please read about these advantages in our services section. (click here)

  • Q: Is anesthesia safe?
  • A: Today's modern anesthetic agents have made anesthesia much safer than in the past. Here at Arnett Animal Hospital we use the safest type of anesthesia available and with state of the art monitoring system we are able to greatly reduce any risk involving anesthesia. We do not use any IV induction, only inhalant anesthesia, thus making anesthesia safer and recovery shorter.

  • Q: What is the pre-anesthetic blood panel?
  • A: Preanesthetic blood testing is important in reducing the risk of anesthesia. Every pet needs blood testing before surgery to ensure that the liver and kidneys are in good shape. Even apparently healthy animals can have serious organ or system problems that cannot be detected without blood testing. If there is a problem, it is much better to find it before it causes anesthetic or surgical complications. Animals that have minor dysfunction will handle the anesthetic better if they receive IV fluids during surgery. If serious problems are detected, surgery can be postponed until the problem is corrected.

  • Q: Do I need any documents to travel with my pet?
  • A: To get all important information about traveling with your pet go to our services.

  • Q: Why is veterinary care for my pet so expensive these days?
  • A: Relatively speaking, veterinary care is a great deal. The cost of veterinary care has actually risen very little during the last 20 to 30 years. When compared to the rising cost of human health care, pet care is not at all unreasonable. Bear in mind that your veterinarian is not only your pet's general physician, but also its surgeon, radiologist, dentist, dermatologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist, psychiatrist, ears/nose/throat doctor, and pharmacist. Your veterinary bill is a reflection of the costs of maintaining suitable facilities, equipment, and support personnel to provide the level of care that is expected in animal medicine today. Remember too that the original cost of the animal has no bearing on the cost of services rendered. Although it may feel as if you are paying more for your pet's health care than your own, chances are that you probably have adequate health care insurance for your own needs. Consequently, you may never see the total bottom-line figure for your own doctor bills. When human health care costs are added up-including insurance, deductibles, and pharmaceutical costs-there is no comparison to the much lower veterinary care costs.